Politicians Want to Protect us From the Evils of On-Line Gambling Part 2

This is part 2 of a multipart series of articles regarding proposed anti-gambling legislation. In this article, I begin discussion of the quoted reasons for this legislation, and the actual facts that exist in the real world.

The legislators are trying to protect us from something, or are they? The whole thing seems a little confusing to say the least.

As mentioned in the previous article, the House, and the Senate, are once again considering the issue of “Online Gambling”. Bills have been submitted by Congressmen Goodlatte and Leach, and also by Senator Kyl.

The bill being put forward by Rep. Goodlatte, The Internet Gambling Prohibition Act, has the stated intention of updating the Wire Act to outlaw all forms of online gambling, to make it illegal for a gambling business to accept credit and electronic transfers, and to force ISPs and Common Carriers to block access to gambling related sites at the request of law enforcement.

Just as does Rep. Goodlatte, Sen. Kyl, in his bill, Prohibition on Funding of Unlawful Internet Gambling, makes it illegal for gambling businesses to accept credit cards, electronic transfers, checks and other forms of payment for the purpose on placing illegal bets, but his bill does not address those that place bets.

The bill submitted by Rep. Leach, The Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act, is basically a copy of the bill submitted by Sen. Kyl. It focuses on preventing gambling businesses from accepting credit cards, electronic transfers, checks, and other payments, and like the Kyl bill makes no changes to what is currently legal, or illegal.

So, regardless of whether online gambling is currently legal or not, just what is it that the politicians are trying to protect us from? Why is it so important to make online gambling illegal?

One answer is contained in this quote from Rep. Goodlatte “will keep children from borrowing the family credit card, logging on to the family computer, and losing thousands of dollars all before their parents get home from work”.

I think a fair translation of that quote would be “American parents are incapable of raising their own children so Congress should step in and do it for them’. Because of course we are all aware that the politicians have a much better idea of what is best for us and our children than we do.

And in another quote “In short, the Internet is a challenge to the sovereignty of civilized communities, States, and nations to decide what is appropriate and decent behavior”.

A reasonable translation of this quote would seem to go something like “Individual Americans are not capable of deciding for themselves what behavior is appropriate and decent in their own homes. Fortunately Congress is here to protect them from themselves and legislate morality for them”.

Not only is Congress supposedly responsible for raising the children of America, but in order to do so, and to prevent us from unknowingly doing something indecent, they are going to legislate what we can do with our own money, on our own time, in our own homes. Does this sound like the very model of a free society, or the beginnings of a misguided totalitarian state?

Let’s delve a little deeper into these protections and see just how interested the politicians really are in making sure that our children are safe from the evils of gambling.

Remember, all of these following forms of gambling are either currently legal, or would be made specifically legal in the bill being put forward by Rep. Goodlatte.

First, we have casinos, and race tracks. These little money makers are proliferating all over the country and generate quite a bit of tax revenue for federal and state governments as well as profits for their operators. The people behind the anti-online gambling bills would have you believe that casinos are not an issue when it comes to underage individuals, since casino staff can see the individuals in person and assess their age.

Quite to the contrary however, we have this quote from The Illinois Institute for Addiction Recovery “Casino kids have been left by themselves at the outer rim of casinos while their parents gamble, according to some casino security officers. In some extreme cases, children are left in the family car in the casino parking lot for hours at a time while their parents gamble inside. Less obviously, children may also spend several hours each week with babysitters while their parents gamble in casinos, bingo halls or card rooms.”

While I certainly wouldn’t try to claim that online gambling is good for the American family, clearly, to the extent that children can relax and play in their own homes, and sleep in their own beds, online gambling presents less of a problem than the current state supported alternative.

Another form of online gambling that the proposed legislation would exempt from illegal status is the sale of lottery tickets by the states over the internet. It is difficult to see how these legislators show deep concern for the children of America based on the following quote from Overcoming Life Digest (July/August, 1998 Issue) “Studies show that lotteries are the favorite legal gambling game for teenagers. Statistically, one of seven who play will become addicted.” And from the Council on Compulsive Gambling of New Jersey (6 June 2003), “Many regard lotteries as a relatively benign form of gambling. However, 31 percent of callers to the 1-800-GAMBLER national hotline (operated by the Council on Compulsive Gambling of New Jersey) indicated problems with lottery gambling.”

In yet another example of government raking in cash without regard for the children of America, we have Video Lottery Machines. Video Lottery Machines, or VLTs are nothing more than state sponsored electronic video poker machines. According to David Plotz in Slate.com on Friday December 17th, 1999 “These are the most addictive of any gambling instrument we have today. It is a cinch for kids to play video lottery machines, since they are often found in businesses that kids frequent.” These devices are being licensed for use in grocery stores, convenience stores, bars and markets around the country, where the children of America have easy access.

Clearly, the legislation proposed does not “keep children from borrowing the family credit card, logging on to the family computer, and losing thousands of dollars all before their parents get home from work”, They will be able to buy lottery tickets, bet on horse races, and head down to the local convenience store to play the VLTs.

In the next article, I will continue coverage of the issues raised by politicians who are against online gambling, and provide a different perspective to their rhetoric, covering the Abramoff card, and the affect of gambling on the family.

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Baccarat Gambling – Part 1; A Fun, Simple Game You Can Win Easily!

Baccarat gambling is fun easy to play and you have a great chance of winning. Here we will look at the basics of baccarat gambling and in part 2 look at some tips to win.

If you have not played Baccarat yet, or want to simply sharpen your skills these articles are for you.

Baccarat Gambling is perhaps the simplest game to play with no decisions made after a bet is placed.
The rules are set and final.

The Dealer at the table must act according to these rules without consulting players. Baccarat gambling can be very exciting nevertheless, and somehow it is made more glamorous than any other game.

A normal baccarat table is about the size of a craps table with up to 3 casino dealers and up to 14 players. Each player, including the player dealing, may still bet on either the player or the banker usually the dealer to bets on the banker.

Rotating around the table, the deal is similar to how the dice rotate around the craps table. A player may pass the shoe to the next player. The same person will keep dealing as long as the banker keeps winning. Baccarat gambling is very simple. Here is how it’s done.

The dealer will put two cards, face down, held under the shoe, and deal the player with the greatest bet on the player the other two cards, face down. This player can view his cards and immediately gives them back to the dealer. The dealer will then turn over the cards and one of the casino dealers will announce the totals.

Depending on the results the dealer may then deal a third card. Finally the dealers will pay winning wagers and collect losing ones out of the dealer’s tray. Nothing could be simpler than baccarat gambling.

Meanings of the hand dealt

A numbered card less than ten is worth its face value, aces are worth 1, and tens and face cards are worth 0. The suit is immaterial. The highest total of any baccarat hand is nine. A two-card total of nine is called a “natural” and cannot lose. A two-card eight is the second-best hand and is called a natural as well. If both player and bank are dealt identical hands, it is a tie and neither wins.

The score of the cards dealt is the right digit of the total of the cards. For example if the two cards were a 6 and 5, then the total would be 11, and the score would be a 1. The totals will range from 0 to 9 and there is no possibility to bust.

Betting Options in Baccarat Gambling

The game begins when all players bet either on the ‘player’, ‘banker’, or a tie.

The Players Options

In case the player or the banker has a total of an 8 or a 9 they both must stand. In case the player has total of 6 or 7, the player must stand. In case the player has total of 5 or less, the player automatically hits.

The Dealers Options

In case the player stands, the banker must hit on a total of 5 or less. In case the player gets the third card then the banker draws a third card according to the following format:

If the banker has total of 0, 1, 2: The banker must draw a third card.

If the banker has total of 3: the banker must draws if the player’s 3rd Card is a 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-9-0 (not 8)

If the banker has total of 4: the banker must draw if player’s 3rd Card is 2-3-4-5-6-7

If the banker has total of 5: the banker must draw if player’s 3rd Card is 4-5-6-7

If the banker has total of 6: the banker must draw if player’s 3rd Card is a 6 or 7

If the banker has total of 7: the banker must stand.

The Winning Hand in Baccarat Gambling

Simply – the winning hand is the one closest to 9.

In part 2 of Baccarat Gambling you can learn how to bet, when to bet, the best strategy, and some secrets of the game.

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The Gambling Roots

Gambling existed from medieval times at all societal levels in various forms. The freedom of engaging in these games was hugely dependent on the social hierarchy state of the individual. Gambling sustained state and church criticism. A traditional community life element included contests that were accompanied by general revelry, drinking and heavy betting.

Bearbaiting and cockfighting in the blood sports range were popular with peasantry sectors. In other social spectrum areas, horseracing pastimes were confined to the upper classes. Horse racing and ownership operated almost exclusively in private affairs for royal patronage systems and monarchs. They organized races and entered horses to compete, personalizing them with assigning their names.

Lotteries initiated in the 15th century, and were popular but arbitrarily illegal in most cases. A widespread gambling form was dice playing and it was the standard game of the medieval period. All society sections inclusive of the clergy-despite many bans and prohibitions, pursued it. The Saxons, Romans and Danes introduced many varieties of games and playing styles, most of the games fell into two types, moving board counters (like checkers), or games that were based on dice throws. The eastern Europeans introduced playing cards toward the end of the 13th century; it became a leisure activity from an elite pastime that was popular with all social classes.

Professional painters, who received patronage from aristocrat households, handcrafted early cards on ivory and copper, wood and card. The first woodcuts on paper were, in fact, playing cards. Gambling was a status marker and leisure pursuits amongst prestigious groups. Games and cards were symbolic of cultural climates and social orders surrounding them. The printing press development in the 15th century played a crucial role in the history of cards and transformed them from aristocratic play things to mass-produced products that were enjoyed by every rank of society.

The state and church continually outlawed or limited gambling despite its growing popularity. Designed to restrict excesses of the general population resulted in legislation being targeted at the poor and therefore uneven in application. Prohibitions imposed from Catholic Churches were aimed at steering people away from idle activities and were pragmatic towards organized exertion like sports. The aim was to rally a workforce into the indigenous army, which served as an advantage to the violent Middle Ages climate.

Card playing was banned on workdays since 1397, and was further criticized. Criticism of gambling continued and the emphasis shifted to effects of disorder within rational societies aimed mainly at the mass of the population, the poor. Legislation in the 17th and 18th centuries attempted to eradicate gambling from the mass populations, by fiscal means of imposing taxes on both dice and cards, charging huge horse races entrance fees and increasing prices of lottery tickets.

European countries also introduced laws that limited public gambling to take place in licensed premises and restricted license granting to upper classes and nobility members. The poor were restricted to playing illegal, unlicensed tavern gambling while upper classes were free to a variety of games. In recent years there have been a diagnosis of gambling addiction condition, which is a progressive illness, it initiates as a recreational activity then becomes destructive with mental, spiritual and physical consequences. The main symbol is loss of control through tendencies towards bigger risks.

Gambling in excess causes depression anxiety, muscular tension, headaches and fatigue. Many addicts even engage in criminal activity to fund the habit.

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